Feeding fresh Green Lipped Mussels to protect Dogs Joints.

How green lipped mussels helped my dogs

Much has been written about the numerous health benefits of feeding green lipped mussels (GLM) to dogs. This food has been mostly found off the coast of New Zealand, but I recently discovered that it is cultured off the Arabian Coast in Goa and I now purchase this locally cultured green lipped mussels.

It was such a delight to know this, especially since I am the only breeder in India who breeds the large South African Boerboel. Boy, are my dogs lucky or what that they have access to this natural joint supplement so easily now. I have been feeding them this nutritious food in the raw form, fresh and dehydrated both. And it’s been wonderful for them. They’re young still but by supplementing their raw diet with the GLM, I am ensuring they will not suffer from arthritis or other joint related issues till very late in their life.

 

Usually raw GLMs isn’t easy to find but thanks to BARF India, pet parents serious about their dog’s joint issues, especially the larger giant breeds, like Rottweiler, German Shepherds, Mastiffs, Hounds, now have a reliable source they can go to.

 

Green Lipped Mussels

 

What are the benefits of GLM for dogs?

GLM are considered beneficial for dogs since they come packed with a bunch of nutritious elements, such as:

  • Minerals
  • Vitamins
  • Omega fatty acids
  • Glucosamine
  • Chondroitin

Each of these plays an important role in keeping joint pain away from your dog for as long as possible. In addition, your dog will also benefit from great skin and coat, and also aid in improving brain function.

 

How to feed your dog green lipped mussels

Whether you choose to feed GLM fresh or dehydrated, your dog is going to reap the most of it either way. BARF India has both options, and I’ve tried them both. My dogs love GLM in any form and can’t seem to get enough of this super-food. You can try both and see which one your dog takes after.

 

Dehydrated GLM

You can feed the whole dehydrated mussel as a treat, or you can include one or two in the main meal, depending on your dog’s size. Dogs weighing over 22 kgs can be safely fed 1-2 mussels per day. For smaller dogs, half a mussel or a smaller piece should be a good component of their daily intake.

 

What I’ve noticed is that dehydrated mussels are not really easy to break into smaller pieces. For smaller dogs, you can either feed them fresh or crush the mussel into a powder and then feed it.

 

Green Lipped Mussels

GLM Powder

I’ve found GLM Powder on Amazon, but one can never be sure if the content is entirely GLM. The easiest way to get the same result is to just crush some of the dehydrated GLMs from BARF India and voila, you have got yourself some GLM powder. This is a good way to get your dog the benefit of GLM in case it is a fussy eater. Simply sprinkle the powder on top of the raw meal and it’ll get eaten up in a jiffy.

 

Raw GLM

You can take raw GLM and cut it into pieces to feed your dog if he is big into raw food. Luckily this seafood doesn’t have the typical strong fishy odour. So you can be sure your hands won’t reek of fish the rest of the day. Of course, you can always wear disposable gloves for the cutting process in case you’re not particularly comfortable handling raw seafood.

 

Like you always do with any raw meat prep for your dog (or yourself), ensure that you wash your hands, the cutting board and knife with hot water and soap. Also wipe down and disinfect all the surfaces that might have come in contact with the raw food. Better safe than sorry later.

 

 

When not to feed your dog green lipped mussels

Is there any reason to not feed your dog GLM? Yes. In case your dog has any kind of shellfish allergy, this is a food to be avoided. If you’re not sure, you can conduct a simple food allergy test. Your vet might be able to help you with that.

 

BARF India has been a great company to get my dog’s raw food from, and with the addition of green lipped mussel, I think, they’ve pulled out all stops.

Related Blogs